Stay at The Waterstreet Hotel and take your place in history
Connect with us!
Image may be subject to copyright
Image may be subject to copyright
Image may be subject to copyright

Area History

The Waterstreet Hotel offers its guests the old-world charm of historic Port Townsend, Washington, a Victorian seaport known for its panoramic mountain and water views. The Waterstreet Hotel occupies the second and third floors of historic N.D. Hill Building. It features waterfront rooms and suites in the heart of downtown Port Townsend. Even with such magnificent glimpses of the Puget Sound,
Mount Baker and the Cascade and Olympic mountains, the hotel is in the heart of downtown Port Townsend. It's within walking distance of myriad shops, theaters, restaurants and the Port Townsend/ Keystone ferry. The Waterstreet Hotel offers some of the most spacious rooms in this Victorian seaport.
The Waterstreet Hotel In the N.D. Hill Building The N.D. Hill Building, one of the two most ornate edifices in downtown Port Townsend, was designed by noted Seattle architect Elmer H. Fisher, who also designed the Hastings Building, Water & Taylor, and Seattle's famous Pioneer Building. Although principally Italianate in design, the N.D. Hill Building shows both Grecian and Romanesque influences. The exterior roof line is well known in architectural circles for the richly decorated eaves with the underlying corbels.
Image may be subject to copyright
Erected in 1889 at a cost of $25,000 by retired pharmacist N.D. Hill, the building remains a beautiful example of the grace and affluence of old Port Townsend. Hill arrived in the Northwest in 1852 and after a stint of farming and managing an Indian Agency on Whidbey Island, he came to Port Townsend. Ultimately he became one of the most successful and well respected men in the Territory of Washington. In addition to the retail pharmacy, Hill became the first manufacturer of medicines and drugs in the area. 
Image may be subject to copyright
The upper floors were offices and furnished rooms. Hill sold drugs, cigars, china, and glassware from a store on the ground floor from 1890 to 1928, he was a shrewd and hard-driving businessman and took full advantage of the pioneer opportunities available, and involved himself in such diverse commercial activities as banking, railroading, sawmills, and telegraph companies. As a Territorial Representative and County Commissioner, Hill became one of the leaders in the drive for statehood. Hard times fell on Port Townsend in the 1890s and the Hill family sold the building, and thus began a long period of poor maintenance and neglect. 
Image may be subject to copyright

Economic conditions were so bad in the Northwest that the building finally was placed on the tax rolls where it remained for many years. The structure has seen many lives since the repeal of Prohibition in 1933. The ground floor has served as a tavern under several owners, and has it itself, due to the ornate bar fixtures reportedly shipped "round the Horn" from the East, attained historical significance. The upper two floors have long been utilized as apartments or hotel rooms.

In more modern times the building has been recognized for its historical importance and is now enrolled on the National Register of Historic Places. A complete program of renovation and restoration has been instituted and is currently ongoing. Despite a severe fire in 1982, the revitalization continues with close attention being paid to the building's historical accuracy. With its close proximity to Port Townsend Bay and its early-day, hand-operated elevator, the building has long been inaccurately associated with smuggling and "shanghaiing". In the early days, the Hill would never have allowed such practices, and by the time the building fell into disrepair, these activities were largely for from the Port Townsend scene N.D.Hill build can be seen in movies such as "An Officer and A Gentleman" in the early 1980's and "Snow Falling on Cedars" in the late 1990s.

In more modern times the building has been recognized for its historical importance and is now enrolled on the National Register of Historic Places. A complete program of renovation and restoration has been instituted and is currently ongoing. Despite a severe fire in 1982, the revitalization continues with close attention being paid to the building's historical accuracy. With its close proximity to Port Townsend Bay and its early-day, hand-operated elevator, the building has long been inaccurately associated with smuggling and "shanghaiing". In the early days, the Hill would never have allowed such practices, and by the time the building fell into disrepair, these activities were largely for from the Port Townsend scene N.D.Hill build can be seen in movies such as "An Officer and A Gentleman" in the early 1980's and "Snow Falling on Cedars" in the late 1990s. 
Guests
Guests over 12
Children
Pets
Room Type
Check Availability